[tcpip] Avoid generating positive zero for transmitted UDP checksums
authorMichael Brown <mcb30@ipxe.org>
Thu, 10 Sep 2015 12:19:16 +0000 (13:19 +0100)
committerMichael Brown <mcb30@ipxe.org>
Thu, 10 Sep 2015 13:46:54 +0000 (14:46 +0100)
commit8baefad65915defc493f28c6d8ac313b1152c858
treeb5e58a57db033faaef1e3cf2b994d994e3b8e5fe
parent15a8800a984239553cbbb6629e076e98a3be7537
[tcpip] Avoid generating positive zero for transmitted UDP checksums

TCP/IP checksum fields are one's complement values and therefore have
two possible representations of zero: positive zero (0x0000) and
negative zero (0xffff).

In RFC768, UDP over IPv4 exploits this redundancy to repurpose the
positive representation of zero (0x0000) to mean "no checksum
calculated"; checksums are optional for UDP over IPv4.

In RFC2460, checksums are made mandatory for UDP over IPv4.  The
wording of the RFC is such that the UDP header is mandated to use only
the negative representation of zero (0xffff), rather than simply
requiring the checksum to be correct but allowing for either
representation of zero to be used.

In RFC1071, an example algorithm is given for calculating the TCP/IP
checksum.  This algorithm happens to produce only the positive
representation of zero (0x0000); this is an artifact of the way that
unsigned arithmetic is used to calculate a signed one's complement
sum (and its final negation).

A common misconception has developed (exemplified in RFC1624) that
this artifact is part of the specification.  Many people have assumed
that the checksum field should never contain the negative
representation of zero (0xffff).

A sensible receiver will calculate the checksum over the whole packet
and verify that the result is zero (in whichever representation of
zero happens to be generated by the receiver's algorithm).  Such a
receiver will not care which representation of zero happens to be used
in the checksum field.

However, there are receivers in existence which will verify the
received checksum the hard way: by calculating the checksum over the
remainder of the packet and comparing the result against the checksum
field.  If the representation of zero used by the receiver's algorithm
does not match the representation of zero used by the transmitter (and
so placed in the checksum field), and if the receiver does not
explicitly allow for both representations to compare as equal, then
the receiver may reject packets with a valid checksum.

For UDP, the combined RFCs effectively mandate that we should generate
only the negative representation of zero in the checksum field.

For IP, TCP and ICMP, the RFCs do not mandate which representation of
zero should be used, but the misconceptions which have grown up around
RFC1071 and RFC1624 suggest that it would be least surprising to
generate only the positive representation of zero in the checksum
field.

Fix by ensuring that all of our checksum algorithms generate only the
positive representation of zero, and explicitly inverting this in the
case of transmitted UDP packets.

Reported-by: Wissam Shoukair <wissams@mellanox.com>
Tested-by: Wissam Shoukair <wissams@mellanox.com>
Signed-off-by: Michael Brown <mcb30@ipxe.org>
src/include/ipxe/tcpip.h
src/net/ipv4.c
src/net/ipv6.c
src/net/udp.c
src/tests/tcpip_test.c