Merge remote-tracking branch 'remotes/armbru/tags/pull-qapi-2017-03-16' into staging
[qemu.git] / docs / lockcnt.txt
1 DOCUMENTATION FOR LOCKED COUNTERS (aka QemuLockCnt)
2 ===================================================
3
4 QEMU often uses reference counts to track data structures that are being
5 accessed and should not be freed.  For example, a loop that invoke
6 callbacks like this is not safe:
7
8     QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
9         if (ioh->revents & G_IO_OUT) {
10             ioh->fd_write(ioh->opaque);
11         }
12     }
13
14 QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE protects against deletion of the current node (ioh)
15 by stashing away its "next" pointer.  However, ioh->fd_write could
16 actually delete the next node from the list.  The simplest way to
17 avoid this is to mark the node as deleted, and remove it from the
18 list in the above loop:
19
20     QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
21         if (ioh->deleted) {
22             QLIST_REMOVE(ioh, next);
23             g_free(ioh);
24         } else {
25             if (ioh->revents & G_IO_OUT) {
26                 ioh->fd_write(ioh->opaque);
27             }
28         }
29     }
30
31 If however this loop must also be reentrant, i.e. it is possible that
32 ioh->fd_write invokes the loop again, some kind of counting is needed:
33
34     walking_handlers++;
35     QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
36         if (ioh->deleted) {
37             if (walking_handlers == 1) {
38                 QLIST_REMOVE(ioh, next);
39                 g_free(ioh);
40             }
41         } else {
42             if (ioh->revents & G_IO_OUT) {
43                 ioh->fd_write(ioh->opaque);
44             }
45         }
46     }
47     walking_handlers--;
48
49 One may think of using the RCU primitives, rcu_read_lock() and
50 rcu_read_unlock(); effectively, the RCU nesting count would take
51 the place of the walking_handlers global variable.  Indeed,
52 reference counting and RCU have similar purposes, but their usage in
53 general is complementary:
54
55 - reference counting is fine-grained and limited to a single data
56   structure; RCU delays reclamation of *all* RCU-protected data
57   structures;
58
59 - reference counting works even in the presence of code that keeps
60   a reference for a long time; RCU critical sections in principle
61   should be kept short;
62
63 - reference counting is often applied to code that is not thread-safe
64   but is reentrant; in fact, usage of reference counting in QEMU predates
65   the introduction of threads by many years.  RCU is generally used to
66   protect readers from other threads freeing memory after concurrent
67   modifications to a data structure.
68
69 - reclaiming data can be done by a separate thread in the case of RCU;
70   this can improve performance, but also delay reclamation undesirably.
71   With reference counting, reclamation is deterministic.
72
73 This file documents QemuLockCnt, an abstraction for using reference
74 counting in code that has to be both thread-safe and reentrant.
75
76
77 QemuLockCnt concepts
78 --------------------
79
80 A QemuLockCnt comprises both a counter and a mutex; it has primitives
81 to increment and decrement the counter, and to take and release the
82 mutex.  The counter notes how many visits to the data structures are
83 taking place (the visits could be from different threads, or there could
84 be multiple reentrant visits from the same thread).  The basic rules
85 governing the counter/mutex pair then are the following:
86
87 - Data protected by the QemuLockCnt must not be freed unless the
88   counter is zero and the mutex is taken.
89
90 - A new visit cannot be started while the counter is zero and the
91   mutex is taken.
92
93 Most of the time, the mutex protects all writes to the data structure,
94 not just frees, though there could be cases where this is not necessary.
95
96 Reads, instead, can be done without taking the mutex, as long as the
97 readers and writers use the same macros that are used for RCU, for
98 example atomic_rcu_read, atomic_rcu_set, QLIST_FOREACH_RCU, etc.  This is
99 because the reads are done outside a lock and a set or QLIST_INSERT_HEAD
100 can happen concurrently with the read.  The RCU API ensures that the
101 processor and the compiler see all required memory barriers.
102
103 This could be implemented simply by protecting the counter with the
104 mutex, for example:
105
106     // (1)
107     qemu_mutex_lock(&walking_handlers_mutex);
108     walking_handlers++;
109     qemu_mutex_unlock(&walking_handlers_mutex);
110
111     ...
112
113     // (2)
114     qemu_mutex_lock(&walking_handlers_mutex);
115     if (--walking_handlers == 0) {
116         QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
117             if (ioh->deleted) {
118                 QLIST_REMOVE(ioh, next);
119                 g_free(ioh);
120             }
121         }
122     }
123     qemu_mutex_unlock(&walking_handlers_mutex);
124
125 Here, no frees can happen in the code represented by the ellipsis.
126 If another thread is executing critical section (2), that part of
127 the code cannot be entered, because the thread will not be able
128 to increment the walking_handlers variable.  And of course
129 during the visit any other thread will see a nonzero value for
130 walking_handlers, as in the single-threaded code.
131
132 Note that it is possible for multiple concurrent accesses to delay
133 the cleanup arbitrarily; in other words, for the walking_handlers
134 counter to never become zero.  For this reason, this technique is
135 more easily applicable if concurrent access to the structure is rare.
136
137 However, critical sections are easy to forget since you have to do
138 them for each modification of the counter.  QemuLockCnt ensures that
139 all modifications of the counter take the lock appropriately, and it
140 can also be more efficient in two ways:
141
142 - it avoids taking the lock for many operations (for example
143   incrementing the counter while it is non-zero);
144
145 - on some platforms, one can implement QemuLockCnt to hold the lock
146   and the mutex in a single word, making the fast path no more expensive
147   than simply managing a counter using atomic operations (see
148   docs/atomics.txt).  This can be very helpful if concurrent access to
149   the data structure is expected to be rare.
150
151
152 Using the same mutex for frees and writes can still incur some small
153 inefficiencies; for example, a visit can never start if the counter is
154 zero and the mutex is taken---even if the mutex is taken by a write,
155 which in principle need not block a visit of the data structure.
156 However, these are usually not a problem if any of the following
157 assumptions are valid:
158
159 - concurrent access is possible but rare
160
161 - writes are rare
162
163 - writes are frequent, but this kind of write (e.g. appending to a
164   list) has a very small critical section.
165
166 For example, QEMU uses QemuLockCnt to manage an AioContext's list of
167 bottom halves and file descriptor handlers.  Modifications to the list
168 of file descriptor handlers are rare.  Creation of a new bottom half is
169 frequent and can happen on a fast path; however: 1) it is almost never
170 concurrent with a visit to the list of bottom halves; 2) it only has
171 three instructions in the critical path, two assignments and a smp_wmb().
172
173
174 QemuLockCnt API
175 ---------------
176
177 The QemuLockCnt API is described in include/qemu/thread.h.
178
179
180 QemuLockCnt usage
181 -----------------
182
183 This section explains the typical usage patterns for QemuLockCnt functions.
184
185 Setting a variable to a non-NULL value can be done between
186 qemu_lockcnt_lock and qemu_lockcnt_unlock:
187
188     qemu_lockcnt_lock(&xyz_lockcnt);
189     if (!xyz) {
190         new_xyz = g_new(XYZ, 1);
191         ...
192         atomic_rcu_set(&xyz, new_xyz);
193     }
194     qemu_lockcnt_unlock(&xyz_lockcnt);
195
196 Accessing the value can be done between qemu_lockcnt_inc and
197 qemu_lockcnt_dec:
198
199     qemu_lockcnt_inc(&xyz_lockcnt);
200     if (xyz) {
201         XYZ *p = atomic_rcu_read(&xyz);
202         ...
203         /* Accesses can now be done through "p".  */
204     }
205     qemu_lockcnt_dec(&xyz_lockcnt);
206
207 Freeing the object can similarly use qemu_lockcnt_lock and
208 qemu_lockcnt_unlock, but you also need to ensure that the count
209 is zero (i.e. there is no concurrent visit).  Because qemu_lockcnt_inc
210 takes the QemuLockCnt's lock, the count cannot become non-zero while
211 the object is being freed.  Freeing an object looks like this:
212
213     qemu_lockcnt_lock(&xyz_lockcnt);
214     if (!qemu_lockcnt_count(&xyz_lockcnt)) {
215         g_free(xyz);
216         xyz = NULL;
217     }
218     qemu_lockcnt_unlock(&xyz_lockcnt);
219
220 If an object has to be freed right after a visit, you can combine
221 the decrement, the locking and the check on count as follows:
222
223     qemu_lockcnt_inc(&xyz_lockcnt);
224     if (xyz) {
225         XYZ *p = atomic_rcu_read(&xyz);
226         ...
227         /* Accesses can now be done through "p".  */
228     }
229     if (qemu_lockcnt_dec_and_lock(&xyz_lockcnt)) {
230         g_free(xyz);
231         xyz = NULL;
232         qemu_lockcnt_unlock(&xyz_lockcnt);
233     }
234
235 QemuLockCnt can also be used to access a list as follows:
236
237     qemu_lockcnt_inc(&io_handlers_lockcnt);
238     QLIST_FOREACH_RCU(ioh, &io_handlers, pioh) {
239         if (ioh->revents & G_IO_OUT) {
240             ioh->fd_write(ioh->opaque);
241         }
242     }
243
244     if (qemu_lockcnt_dec_and_lock(&io_handlers_lockcnt)) {
245         QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
246             if (ioh->deleted) {
247                 QLIST_REMOVE(ioh, next);
248                 g_free(ioh);
249             }
250         }
251         qemu_lockcnt_unlock(&io_handlers_lockcnt);
252     }
253
254 Again, the RCU primitives are used because new items can be added to the
255 list during the walk.  QLIST_FOREACH_RCU ensures that the processor and
256 the compiler see the appropriate memory barriers.
257
258 An alternative pattern uses qemu_lockcnt_dec_if_lock:
259
260     qemu_lockcnt_inc(&io_handlers_lockcnt);
261     QLIST_FOREACH_SAFE_RCU(ioh, &io_handlers, next, pioh) {
262         if (ioh->deleted) {
263             if (qemu_lockcnt_dec_if_lock(&io_handlers_lockcnt)) {
264                 QLIST_REMOVE(ioh, next);
265                 g_free(ioh);
266                 qemu_lockcnt_inc_and_unlock(&io_handlers_lockcnt);
267             }
268         } else {
269             if (ioh->revents & G_IO_OUT) {
270                 ioh->fd_write(ioh->opaque);
271             }
272         }
273     }
274     qemu_lockcnt_dec(&io_handlers_lockcnt);
275
276 Here you can use qemu_lockcnt_dec instead of qemu_lockcnt_dec_and_lock,
277 because there is no special task to do if the count goes from 1 to 0.