Merge remote-tracking branch 'remotes/rth/tags/pull-arm-20211021' into staging
[qemu.git] / docs / qcow2-cache.txt
1 qcow2 L2/refcount cache configuration
2 =====================================
3 Copyright (C) 2015, 2018-2020 Igalia, S.L.
4 Author: Alberto Garcia <berto@igalia.com>
5
6 This work is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL, version 2 or
7 later. See the COPYING file in the top-level directory.
8
9 Introduction
10 ------------
11 The QEMU qcow2 driver has two caches that can improve the I/O
12 performance significantly. However, setting the right cache sizes is
13 not a straightforward operation.
14
15 This document attempts to give an overview of the L2 and refcount
16 caches, and how to configure them.
17
18 Please refer to the docs/interop/qcow2.txt file for an in-depth
19 technical description of the qcow2 file format.
20
21
22 Clusters
23 --------
24 A qcow2 file is organized in units of constant size called clusters.
25
26 The cluster size is configurable, but it must be a power of two and
27 its value 512 bytes or higher. QEMU currently defaults to 64 KB
28 clusters, and it does not support sizes larger than 2MB.
29
30 The 'qemu-img create' command supports specifying the size using the
31 cluster_size option:
32
33    qemu-img create -f qcow2 -o cluster_size=128K hd.qcow2 4G
34
35
36 The L2 tables
37 -------------
38 The qcow2 format uses a two-level structure to map the virtual disk as
39 seen by the guest to the disk image in the host. These structures are
40 called the L1 and L2 tables.
41
42 There is one single L1 table per disk image. The table is small and is
43 always kept in memory.
44
45 There can be many L2 tables, depending on how much space has been
46 allocated in the image. Each table is one cluster in size. In order to
47 read or write data from the virtual disk, QEMU needs to read its
48 corresponding L2 table to find out where that data is located. Since
49 reading the table for each I/O operation can be expensive, QEMU keeps
50 an L2 cache in memory to speed up disk access.
51
52 The size of the L2 cache can be configured, and setting the right
53 value can improve the I/O performance significantly.
54
55
56 The refcount blocks
57 -------------------
58 The qcow2 format also maintains a reference count for each cluster.
59 Reference counts are used for cluster allocation and internal
60 snapshots. The data is stored in a two-level structure similar to the
61 L1/L2 tables described above.
62
63 The second level structures are called refcount blocks, are also one
64 cluster in size and the number is also variable and dependent on the
65 amount of allocated space.
66
67 Each block contains a number of refcount entries. Their size (in bits)
68 is a power of two and must not be higher than 64. It defaults to 16
69 bits, but a different value can be set using the refcount_bits option:
70
71    qemu-img create -f qcow2 -o refcount_bits=8 hd.qcow2 4G
72
73 QEMU keeps a refcount cache to speed up I/O much like the
74 aforementioned L2 cache, and its size can also be configured.
75
76
77 Choosing the right cache sizes
78 ------------------------------
79 In order to choose the cache sizes we need to know how they relate to
80 the amount of allocated space.
81
82 The part of the virtual disk that can be mapped by the L2 and refcount
83 caches (in bytes) is:
84
85    disk_size = l2_cache_size * cluster_size / 8
86    disk_size = refcount_cache_size * cluster_size * 8 / refcount_bits
87
88 With the default values for cluster_size (64KB) and refcount_bits
89 (16), this becomes:
90
91    disk_size = l2_cache_size * 8192
92    disk_size = refcount_cache_size * 32768
93
94 So in order to cover n GB of disk space with the default values we
95 need:
96
97    l2_cache_size = disk_size_GB * 131072
98    refcount_cache_size = disk_size_GB * 32768
99
100 For example, 1MB of L2 cache is needed to cover every 8 GB of the virtual
101 image size (given that the default cluster size is used):
102
103    8 GB / 8192 = 1 MB
104
105 The refcount cache is 4 times the cluster size by default. With the default
106 cluster size of 64 KB, it is 256 KB (262144 bytes). This is sufficient for
107 8 GB of image size:
108
109    262144 * 32768 = 8 GB
110
111
112 How to configure the cache sizes
113 --------------------------------
114 Cache sizes can be configured using the -drive option in the
115 command-line, or the 'blockdev-add' QMP command.
116
117 There are three options available, and all of them take bytes:
118
119 "l2-cache-size":         maximum size of the L2 table cache
120 "refcount-cache-size":   maximum size of the refcount block cache
121 "cache-size":            maximum size of both caches combined
122
123 There are a few things that need to be taken into account:
124
125  - Both caches must have a size that is a multiple of the cluster size
126    (or the cache entry size: see "Using smaller cache sizes" below).
127
128  - The maximum L2 cache size is 32 MB by default on Linux platforms (enough
129    for full coverage of 256 GB images, with the default cluster size). This
130    value can be modified using the "l2-cache-size" option. QEMU will not use
131    more memory than needed to hold all of the image's L2 tables, regardless
132    of this max. value.
133    On non-Linux platforms the maximal value is smaller by default (8 MB) and
134    this difference stems from the fact that on Linux the cache can be cleared
135    periodically if needed, using the "cache-clean-interval" option (see below).
136    The minimal L2 cache size is 2 clusters (or 2 cache entries, see below).
137
138  - The default (and minimum) refcount cache size is 4 clusters.
139
140  - If only "cache-size" is specified then QEMU will assign as much
141    memory as possible to the L2 cache before increasing the refcount
142    cache size.
143
144  - At most two of "l2-cache-size", "refcount-cache-size", and "cache-size"
145    can be set simultaneously.
146
147 Unlike L2 tables, refcount blocks are not used during normal I/O but
148 only during allocations and internal snapshots. In most cases they are
149 accessed sequentially (even during random guest I/O) so increasing the
150 refcount cache size won't have any measurable effect in performance
151 (this can change if you are using internal snapshots, so you may want
152 to think about increasing the cache size if you use them heavily).
153
154 Before QEMU 2.12 the refcount cache had a default size of 1/4 of the
155 L2 cache size. This resulted in unnecessarily large caches, so now the
156 refcount cache is as small as possible unless overridden by the user.
157
158
159 Using smaller cache entries
160 ---------------------------
161 The qcow2 L2 cache can store complete tables. This means that if QEMU
162 needs an entry from an L2 table then the whole table is read from disk
163 and is kept in the cache. If the cache is full then a complete table
164 needs to be evicted first.
165
166 This can be inefficient with large cluster sizes since it results in
167 more disk I/O and wastes more cache memory.
168
169 Since QEMU 2.12 you can change the size of the L2 cache entry and make
170 it smaller than the cluster size. This can be configured using the
171 "l2-cache-entry-size" parameter:
172
173    -drive file=hd.qcow2,l2-cache-size=2097152,l2-cache-entry-size=4096
174
175 Since QEMU 4.0 the value of l2-cache-entry-size defaults to 4KB (or
176 the cluster size if it's smaller).
177
178 Some things to take into account:
179
180  - The L2 cache entry size has the same restrictions as the cluster
181    size (power of two, at least 512 bytes).
182
183  - Smaller entry sizes generally improve the cache efficiency and make
184    disk I/O faster. This is particularly true with solid state drives
185    so it's a good idea to reduce the entry size in those cases. With
186    rotating hard drives the situation is a bit more complicated so you
187    should test it first and stay with the default size if unsure.
188
189  - Try different entry sizes to see which one gives faster performance
190    in your case. The block size of the host filesystem is generally a
191    good default (usually 4096 bytes in the case of ext4, hence the
192    default).
193
194  - Only the L2 cache can be configured this way. The refcount cache
195    always uses the cluster size as the entry size.
196
197  - If the L2 cache is big enough to hold all of the image's L2 tables
198    (as explained in the "Choosing the right cache sizes" and "How to
199    configure the cache sizes" sections in this document) then none of
200    this is necessary and you can omit the "l2-cache-entry-size"
201    parameter altogether. In this case QEMU makes the entry size
202    equal to the cluster size by default.
203
204
205 Reducing the memory usage
206 -------------------------
207 It is possible to clean unused cache entries in order to reduce the
208 memory usage during periods of low I/O activity.
209
210 The parameter "cache-clean-interval" defines an interval (in seconds),
211 after which all the cache entries that haven't been accessed during the
212 interval are removed from memory. Setting this parameter to 0 disables this
213 feature.
214
215 The following example removes all unused cache entries every 15 minutes:
216
217    -drive file=hd.qcow2,cache-clean-interval=900
218
219 If unset, the default value for this parameter is 600 on platforms which
220 support this functionality, and is 0 (disabled) on other platforms.
221
222 This functionality currently relies on the MADV_DONTNEED argument for
223 madvise() to actually free the memory. This is a Linux-specific feature,
224 so cache-clean-interval is not supported on other systems.
225
226
227 Extended L2 Entries
228 -------------------
229 All numbers shown in this document are valid for qcow2 images with normal
230 64-bit L2 entries.
231
232 Images with extended L2 entries need twice as much L2 metadata, so the L2
233 cache size must be twice as large for the same disk space.
234
235    disk_size = l2_cache_size * cluster_size / 16
236
237 i.e.
238
239    l2_cache_size = disk_size * 16 / cluster_size
240
241 Refcount blocks are not affected by this.